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Monthly Archives: December 2013

Uber Taxi

Uber, the San Francisco start-up that gained something of a cult following by helping people summon a luxury sedan with a smartphone app, is trying something new for people who ride with friends. It said on Monday that it would add the ability to split fares between multiple passengers with a few button taps. The fare-splitting feature will become available when iPhone and Android users download a software update. To split a fare, a user requests a ride and then taps an arrow next to the driver’s information. An option labeled “Split fare” will show up, and the user can select friends from his or her address book. The friends then receive a text message from Uber with a link to tap on. Those who are registered with Uber will be directed to the app, and those who are not will be asked to downloaded the app, sign up for an account and enter their credit card information. The app will take care of the payment at the end of the trip.

Read the full story at the New York Times.

If you’ve been waiting for a price drop to buy a Microsoft Surface tablet, your time is now. Microsoft recently announced a significant price cut in its entry-level Surface RT tablets. These are the less powerful Surface tablets on the market, and don’t run the full version of Windows 8. However, the Surface RTs are decent in their own right, and are now $150 cheaper. A 32 gig model now runs $349, and doubling the storage to 64 gigs will cost $100 more at $449. The price cut was likely the result of a few factors, including poor sales numbers and new models likely to hit store shelves later this year. The line of Surface tablets has yet to truly take off, but Microsoft is rumored to be debuting new accessories for the Surface soon, including a battery-equipped keyboard cover. If you’re looking to try out a lite version of Windows 8 or are just looking for a mid-range tablet option, the Surface RT is now available at $349, its lowest price ever.

Dmitri Leonov

Sanebox is an incredibly smart email inbox filtering system that separates the emails you need to deal with right away from those that can wait. That means no more information overload and improved productivity – two things that are always good. Shelly talked to Dmitri Leonov, the VP of Growth for Sanebox, to find out how he can take control of his inbox… and how you can, too! Find out all about Sanebox’s tips and tricks by listening now.

Google is setting up six pop-up shops for the holidays – though word seems to have gotten out prematurely, as its Winter Wonderlab site keeps going down. The stores seem to be set in suburban shopping areas, rather than floating on fanciful barges.

For the moment, a video about the Wonderlab’s giant snow globes – where guests will apparently be invited to come jump around while being filmed in slo-mo, with 3-D CGI snowflakes added on top – is what we’ve got:

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In AllThingsD‘s Q&A with Jack Tretton this week, the Sony Computer Entertainment of America CEO explained at length why he thinks the new PlayStation 4 can weather the storm of changing media habits and increased competition in the living room.

For the superfans, though, that’s all moot. The gaming world may be a very different place from what it was in 2006, but one thing hasn’t changed: Sony (and, no doubt, Microsoft next week) can still expect the faithful to treat midnight console launches as celebrations. Here’s what happened at Sony and GameStop’s PS4 launch party in San Francisco on Thursday night.:

  • Octodad (or, rather, someone dressed as the indie game star) poses for a picture.

  • The PS4 faithful line up outside of GameStop.

  • One of the PS4′s launch titles is Knack, an action-platformer game published by Sony Computer Entertainment Japan.

  • Another gamer plays 2K Sports’ basketball game NBA 2K14, a cross-platform title also available to buy at launch.

  • It wouldn’t be a party without balloons.

  • A bit crowded.

  • PlayStation 4 boxes awaiting owners inside GameStop.

  • The winner of a PS4 raffle shakes hands with PlayStation SVP of Sales Tim Bender.

  • GameStop President Tony Bartel and Bender pose for photos behind the counter.

  • Some people take their gaming consoles seriously. The first person to buy a PS4 on the west coast holds it aloft.

  • And some people take them even more seriously than that. It’s no V-J Day in Times Square, but…

(Photos by Vjeran Pavic)

The boisterous venture capitalist Tim Draper will not be an investment partner for the next fund of the firm that his name headlines, Draper Fisher Jurvetson confirmed today after a Fortune scoop. DFJ said Draper will be one of the largest contributors to the new fund and will remain a member of the firm’s management committee, but will not be an investing partner as he focuses on other projects, like the entrepreneurship program that also bears his name, Draper University.

xbox one youtube app

An update from the weird world of Microsoft-Google relations: Microsoft and Google relations remain weird.

The specifics: Google’s YouTube and Microsoft’s gaming group have created a new YouTube app for Xbox One, Microsoft’s new console. That isn’t surprising, since YouTube and Microsoft had collaborated on an app for Xbox One’s predecessor, Xbox 360.

The only reason it’s worth noting at all – Microsoft has a lot of people making apps for the Xbox One – is that Microsoft and Google still haven’t figured out a way to get a YouTube app on Microsoft’s Windows Phones.

The companies have had an ongoing dispute which doesn’t make any sense to anyone outside of Redmond and Mountain View, and baffles many people who do work at those places.

The short version is that Google has shut down Microsoft’s attempt to build its own mobile YouTube app twice this year, and right now the Windows Phones remain app-less, though Windows Phone users can still watch YouTube via their Web browsers.

So to sum up: Microsoft and Google are perfectly capable of working together. Except when they can’t.

Many companies regularly look up job applicants online as part of the hiring process. A new study suggests they may also use what they find to discriminate.

The study, a Carnegie Mellon University experiment involving dummy r sum s and social-media profiles, found that between 10 percent and a third of U.S. firms searched social networks for job applicants’ information early in the hiring process. In those cases, candidates whose public Facebook profiles indicated they were Muslim were less likely to be called for interviews than Christian applicants. The difference was particularly pronounced in parts of the country where more people identify themselves as conservative. In those places, Christian applicants got callbacks 17 percent of the time, compared with about 2 percent for Muslims.

Read the rest of this post on the original site

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