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Unsubtle reminder from Facebook to media companies: We’re really big, and we can send you a lot of traffic.

The longer version comes here, via a Facebook blog post boasting about all the eyeballs they have passed along to sites like BuzzFeed and Bleacher Report recently, in an experiment to boost referral traffic.

Facebook said it got those sites and 27 others to increase by 57 percent the number of articles they posted to the social network, and that those sites saw their referral traffic jump by 80 percent.

The bigger picture is that Facebook is making a renewed effort to get media companies to distribute their stuff on the site.

Today’s blog post is specifically about Web publishers. But Facebook has been making a particular push to engage TV programmers and networks to use the site, in the way that Twitter has been doing for a couple of years.

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If you were onstage, talking to Charlie Rose, in front of a very crowded room of ad people, and you were asked to describe the unique qualities of Larry Page and Mark Zuckerberg, you might get flustered.

Not Marissa Mayer.

Here’s what the Yahoo CEO had to say about the Google CEO and the Facebook CEO at the IAB/MIXX conference in New York today:

I’ve thought about it before. They each have their superpower.

Larry’s superpower is asking “Why not? Why does it have to be this way?”

I once witnessed a conversation where Larry really started challenging Dean Kamen, the guy who invented the Segway. He started saying “Why, why, why does it have to be this way?”

And he was actually having an argument over a physical constant. Finally [Kamen] said “because it’s a physical constant – an intrinsic property of the universe.”

And so, he loves to ask “why not, why not, why not.” His super power is asking “why not.” On everything. It helps him challenge.

Zuckerberg’s incredibly insightful about people. And that makes him a great leader, it makes him a great recruiter.

And I think it also makes him a great person to run a platform that connects us all. He really understands people and what makes them tick.”

AOL plans to sell some of its ads via what it is calling the first “programmatic upfront” event in September. The idea, modeled after the method TV networks traditionally use to sell their ads, is to convince marketers to commit to buying a certain amount of AOL’s inventory using automated ad technology, a big push for CEO Tim Armstrong.

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