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Apple

iPad Air

If you had to guess how Apple will build a new iPad model based on the current iPad Air, surely a new processor would be part of your thoughts. That’s what Apple intends to do, says one analyst with a relatively good track record on figuring out Apple’s next product moves. The iPad Air 2 will use a new A8 chip and include the Touch ID fingerprint reader, according to KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Apple Insider took a peek at Kuo’s most recent research note for Apple, which includes several educated guesses. Kuo expects a late third-quarter launch for the iPad Air 2 and thinks that TSMC will build the new A8 chip for Apple, which would take business away from Samsung. TSMC is reportedly already building the yet-unannounced A8 chips for Apple, which makes sense from a timing perspective: Apple will likely need millions of the chips for multiple products in the next few months, including the next iPhone and iPad mini with retina display.

Read the full story at Giga OM.

Forrester has researched that Apple will be selling $39 billion in iPads and Macs through the year 2014.
The latest report of this firm said that Apple will sale $11 billion of iPad and $7 billion of Macs in the corporate market, this year. Moreover, they will sale $13 billion of iPads and $8 billion in Macs.
Forrester Analyst- Mr. Andrew Bartels has mentioned three reasons of Apple’s success in the corporate market. These are:
An excellent product which employees want to use and they feel proud when their firm gives them.

  1. iPad turns to the first and best class tablet
  2. Apple is corporate sales organisation and has been quite responsive to the demands and offer competitive prices.

Gartner has presented his magical equation for the mobile market as:

Apple is developing a workflow and reportedly said that in October, Apple’s iWork Suite will be integrating with VMware Horizon. This suite will create virtual environment on phone to divide the work from personal data.

Also Android mobile market is growing and showing the industry how it will take shape.

In 2012, the global corporate spending for the Wintel tablets and PCS has been gone down by 4% and it will also be flat in 2013. And this is because the old window desktop PCs will be slowly replaced by windows machines- the Tablets, Laptops and other devices. Lastly, it is forecasted that in 2014, the demand for the PC and windows 8 devices will enjoy 8% increase and this growth will be double digital lesser than the growth of Apple, Linux and Android products.

The growth rate enjoyed by Android and Linux devices is due to the Android tablets- Samsung is leader. They are making their way to the corporate markets and having low base yet high growth rate.

In the nutshell, Apple is continuously forcing fundamentals and changing the way people live and work. In this regards, upcoming challenge is to separate the corporate data from personal data over devices, whether it is Android smartphone or iPad.

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OS X Mavericks

New operating systems always bring new problems, and Mavericks is no different. The Migration Assistant in Mountain Lion had a tendency to crash while copying over your files, while other Macs with the OS dropped Wi-Fi after waking from sleep. The Mavericks update seems to have gone smoothly for most, but it’s far from trouble-free. Big issues like flickering USB-attached displays and QuickLook being anything but quick will have to be addressed by Apple. But there are also a number of problems that can be fixed – or at least worked around while Apple cooks up an update. Here are some of the biggest annoyances Mavericks users are currently dealing with and how to fix them. We’ll update the list as new issues arise. If it seems like your free copy of Mavericks has been downloading forever, you’re not alone.

Read the full story at Wired.

Xcode_icon

Apple’s Developer Center is finally back online, after taking a break for over a week. The developer site went down after a hacking attempt mid-week last week, and stayed down without any kind of return for multiple days. The hack was reportedly one that only affected developer accounts, after an intruder attempted to secure personal information.

Apple said at the time that it was possible personal information including developer names, mailing addresses and email addresses could have been accessed, but no credit card data was leaked. Apple offered no time-table for return at the time, but did create a system for tracking the status of the site after a week of downtime, and started bringing things back online slowly.

A researcher reported that he’d possibly prompted the down time after probing the dev center and reporting bugs regarding vulnerabilities in it and the iAd Workbench site, but we’ve reached out to Apple for more specific information about the return and what steps led to it, and will update with a response if we receive one.

Update: Here’s the full text of the email sent to developers by Apple about the outage.

We appreciate your patience as we work to bring our developers services back online. Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles, software downloads, and other developer services are now available. If you would like to know the availability of a particular system, visit our status page.

If your program membership expired or is set to expire during this downtime, it will be extended and your app will remain on the App Store. If you have any other concerns about your account, please contact us.

Thank you for bearing with us while we bring these important systems back online. We will continue to update you on our progress.

VAIO

In 2005, Steve Jobs’ announcement that Apple’s computers would be moving from PowerPC to Intel surprised many. OS X had been living “a secret double life” with Intel for five years, said Jobs, but according to a new report from Japan, that life almost included an even more shocking partner – Sony. Japanese freelance writer Nobuyuki Hayashi, who has covered Apple for over two decades, quotes ex-Sony president Kunitake Ando recalling a 2001 meeting between him and Jobs in Hawaii. After playing a round of golf with other Sony executives, says Ando, “Steve Jobs and another Apple executive were waiting for us at the end of the golf course holding VAIO running Mac OS.” Jobs had shut down the Mac “clone” business years earlier but, according to Ando, admired Sony’s VAIO line so much he was “willing to make an exception.”

Read the full story at The Verge, and read Nobuyuki Hayashi’s full story here.

154438180 520x245 Following a recent fatality, Apple publishes Chinese web page encouraging use of official chargers

Following two back-to-back accidents in China believed to be iPhone-related, Apple has added a page to its China website dedicated exclusively to informing consumers about its chargers.

A message at the top of the page states that Apple has always placed the safety of its consumers as a foremost concern, and that all of its products, including the iPhone and iPad, must go through rigorous testing for safety and reliability.

The passage then reads (translated from the Chinese):

When you charge your iPhone or iPad, we suggest that you use all USB power adapters with correspondingly-labeled USB cables. These adapters and cables can be purchased as individual items from Apple and authorized Apple retailers.

Below the message, the page features detailed pictures of the power adapters for some of Apple’s latest devices, with specifications for the each adapter’s corresponding power cord and red arrows pointing to the official Apple guarantee labels on each device.

AppleAdapterChinaPics 730x332 Following a recent fatality, Apple publishes Chinese web page encouraging use of official chargers

The appearance of the page, which is unique to Apple’s China site, is almost certainly in response to two life-threatening incidents in China purportedly involving counterfeit Apple device chargers. Earlier this month Ma Ailun, a 23 year old woman from Xinjiang, died tragically from electric shock when she allegedly used her iPhone 5 while connected to an unauthorized charger. Just days after that, a man from Beijing fell into a coma after allegedly inserting a third-party charger into his iPhone 4. Both incidents made international headlines.

Following Ma’s death, Apple issued a statement expressing condolences to the Ma family, and pledged to investigate the matter and cooperate with authorities.

By publishing the webpage, Apple is making a concerted effort to show support for its customers in a year in which it received several towel-whippings from the Chinese media. The company came under scrutiny in April, when the People’s Daily (China’s foremost party-mouthpiece newspaper) issued reports accusing the company of shirking on its warranty policy in China. The incident prompted Apple CEO Tim Cook to issue a formal apology.

In its latest earnings report Apple revealed that its revenues in China dropped 14 percent year-on-year, but this statistic is best understood as a temporary lull. The company remains bullish towards the Middle Kingdom, with Tim Cook stating earlier this year that China is Apple’s most important market, and that the company intends to double the number of Apple stores in the country within two years.

Top image credit: Feng Li/Getty Images

154977547 520x245 European Commission accepts Penguins proposals to scrap Apple ebook agency agreements

The European Commission has accepted book publisher Penguin’s proposals to scrap all of its existing ebook agency agreements – including its deal with Apple, most importantly – and refrain from adopting any similar partnerships for the next five years.

Penguin, along with competitors Simon & Schuster, Harper Collins, Hachette, Holtzbrinck, were all criticized for working with Apple and damaging the European ebook market by switching to an agency model.

This allowed the publisher, rather than the retailer, to set the sticker price seen by consumers in digital storefronts. Given that Apple takes a 30 percent cut of each sale regardless, this suited both the publishers and iBookstore vendor just fine. It also prevented other retailers, such as Amazon or Google, from undercutting these prices.

It differs from the wholesale model, whereby retailers are able to negotiate with publishers for the general rights to an ebook and then sell it at whatever price they like. The European Commission has concluded that Apple may have been trying to control ebook prices – a breach of antitrust rules in the European Union.

Under the new agreement, a two year “cooling-off” period will be instigated, by which all retailers will be able to discount Penguin ebook titles as they see fit.

The book publisher is also banned from using the so-called Most Favored Nation (MFN) clause – which meant publishers had to price ebooks on Apple’s services at least as low as the cheapest price offered by any other retailer – in all necessary renegotiations.

Joaqu n Almunia, Commission Vice-President in charge of competition policy, said: “After our decision of December 2012, the commitments are now legally binding on Apple and all five publishers including Penguin, restoring a competitive environment in the market for ebooks”.

A similar antitrust case in the United States came to a close in May this year when Pearson, Penguin’s parent publisher, confirmed it would pay $75 million in consumer damages. A US federal judge has since ruled that Apple truly did conspire to raise the price of ebooks across the market.

Apple has since confirmed that it plans to appeal the decision. “Apple did not conspire to fix ebook pricing and we will continue to fight against these false accusations,” company spokesman Tom Neumayr said. “When we introduced the iBookstore in 2010, we gave customers more choice, injecting much needed innovation and competition into the market, breaking Amazon’s monopolistic grip on the publishing industry.

“We’ve done nothing wrong and we will appeal the judge’s decision.”

Image Credit: LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images

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