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A U.S. judge has granted class-action status to a lawsuit that alleges major Silicon Valley companies suppressed employee compensation by agreeing not to solicit each other’s workers, according to a court filing.

Lucy Koh, a California federal judge for the northern district, ruled that the technical class members’ interests in the case, as well as the nature of the defendants’ alleged overarching conspiracy, weighed in favor of having the case litigated as a class action.

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The federal government is set to slap Infosys Ltd. with the largest immigration fine ever, claiming the Indian outsourcing giant illegally placed workers on visitor, rather than work, visas at big corporate clients across the U.S.

The government is expected to announce Wednesday it will fine Infosys about $35 million, according to people close to the matter. An investigation by the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department found that the Indian company used inexpensive, easy-to-obtain B-1 visas meant to cover short business visits – instead of harder-to-get H-1B work visas – to bring an unknown number of its employees for long-term stays, these people say.

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Indian outsourcing giant Infosys Ltd. said Wednesday it has reached a $34 million civil settlement with U.S. authorities that would “resolve all allegations” and end visa-fraud investigations against the company.

For more than two years, the U.S. Justice Department and the Homeland Security Department investigated Infosys’s visa practices, prompted by allegations that it had improperly used business-travel documents to place employees in long-term positions in American companies.

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The way things are going, the term “cable TV” may have to be replaced by “phone TV.”

Nearly a decade after Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Inc. began building pipelines to carry TV service to U.S. homes, they are nearing the market share of cable operators in areas where they operate, according to third-quarter results released by cable and phone companies in recent days. The top two cable providers, Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., shed 435,000 video customers in the quarter, while AT&T and Verizon added 400,000.

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The Central Intelligence Agency is building a vast database of international money transfers that includes millions of Americans’ financial and personal data, officials familiar with the program say.

The program, which collects information from U.S. money-transfer companies including Western Union, is carried out under the same provision of the Patriot Act that enables the National Security Agency to collect nearly all American phone records, the officials said. Like the NSA program, the mass collection of financial transactions is authorized by a secret national-security court, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

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Electronics retailers are bracing for a tough holiday season, as already-narrow profit margins are expected to be shaved even thinner.

Best Buy Co. shares plunged 11 percentTuesday, after the electronics chain warned investors that it was prepared to sharply cut prices – even at the risk of its profit margins – to keep up with competitors that are aggressively discounting to win market share. Chief among those rivals is Walmart Stores Inc., which last week stated bluntly that it will turn to even more price cuts to boost its stagnant sales.

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Hedge-fund investor Dan Loeb’s campaign to persuade Sony to spin off part of its entertainment business was beneficial for the company, Chief Executive Kazuo Hirai said, making one of his first public comments since rejecting the proposal. Sony is better off holding on to all of its movie and music businesses, Hirai said, but he agreed with a few of the billionaire investor’s other points. Loeb’s Third Point LLC wanted to take up to 20 percent of Sony’s entertainment arm public.

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